Sustrans News

  • Ellesmere Port celebrates bikes and boats
    by Sustrans on 18th July 2018 at 8:11 PM

    16 July 2018, A procession of around 100 boat-themed bicycles joined Ellesmere Port’s popular Bikes and Boats Festival last weekend.   The fun-packed day, which Sustrans organised with the National Waterways Museum, was inspired by Ellesmere Port’s bike carnivals of the 1900s. It included a decorated boat-themed bike ride from Whitby Park to the National Waterways Museum, with a send-off by Ellesmere Port brass band, and a Mini Bike and Boats Ride in Whitby Park for youngsters on scooters and stabilisers. The National Waterways Museum offered free admission during the Festival and there was a packed programme of bike and boat activities, including Danny Butler’s Extreme Mountain Bike Show, novelty bikes and a competition for the best-dressed bikes. Sustrans Organiser Ali Dore said: “The Bikes and Boats Festival recreated the spirit of the Bike carnivals and was a fun day out for all the family. There was free entry to the National Waterways Museum and Danny Butler gave an awe-inspiring performance. People also had a chance to try out cycling on the National Cycle Network through the town and along the canal." Sustrans has been working with the local community in Ellesmere Port for two years to help identify ways to improve public spaces and encourage more walking and cycling. Route 563 of the National Cycle Network links Ellesmere Port to the canal and the National Waterways Museum. The Ellesmere Port Community Places project is based on a concept first developed in the streets of New York. Sustrans community street designers use simple ideas such as pop up outdoor cafes, plants and temporary art installations to calm roads and encourage people to reclaim the streets as public spaces for community events, walking and cycling. Ellesmere Port Community Places project is funded by the Peoples’ Health Trust using money raised by HealthFit. Find out more about Sustrans Community Street design project in Ellesmere Port […]

  • How you can support 20mph in Bristol
    by Sustrans on 18th July 2018 at 8:11 PM

    16 July 2018, , We fundamentally support 20mph and the benefits slower, safer speeds bring to the city and to vulnerable road users. Our policy is that all built up areas should have a default 20mph speed limit as one of the most effective ways of reducing danger on our roads. A person hit by a car travelling at 30mph is 8 times more likely to die than if hit by a car travelling at 20mph. Research into Bristol’s 20mph limits by the University of the West of England has shown that they save lives, and benefit Bristol’s economy by as much as £15million per year. We are seeking your support. Bristol City Council has just started a review into the city’s 20mph limits which we would urge you to participate in. Councillors will be receiving feedback from their constituents until 31 August 2018. Without action to safeguard 20mph, we fear that Councillors will only be influenced by those who would like to see slower, safer streets revert to 30mph. Please follow this link to complete the online survey for roads where you live, your children go to school and where you shop. These three categories are important. Most people support 20mph on residential streets and around schools. However the consultation asks for views on main roads too – this is where most of our shopping high streets are, where people need to cross the road while walking children to school or where we commute by bike to work. We believe 20mph on streets like Gloucester Road, Church Road or Wells Road are as important as the nearby residential streets. The consultation is simple to complete, and crucially, only the ‘About You’ section needs to be completed for your views to count. This should take no longer than three minutes of your time. Take part in the 20mph review survey&nbs […]

  • Working with residents in Lincoln to develop a local masterplan
    by Sustrans on 18th July 2018 at 8:11 PM

    13 July 2018We've been working with local residents in Sincil Bank, Lincoln to develop new ideas to improve the Sincil Drain watercourse and the spaces that adjoin it. At the end of the process we'll have developed a new masterplan framework covering the area between Spencer St and the East/West Link Road (Tentercroft St). These ideas will then be presented to key delivery partners and stakeholders in September. Recently we've been discussing ideas with residents at community engagement workshops. Firstly on Sewell’s Walk Bridge on the 19th May and another follow-up session took place on the 9th June on Kesteven Street. During the workshop we rolled out our “street kit” to temporarily re-imagine the layout of local space. As part of the engagement process local project champions will also engage with other residents and feedback their ideas into the final masterplan being presented in September. So far over 45 residents have signed up for information about the scheme and 175 votes have been cast in support of some of the ideas which have been put forward. These improvements include quick wins like tidying up the area which includes painting local railings. Many residents would like to make the area more of a people place, improving the wildlife value and appearance of the drain while others would like to see events and markets taking place. The project has been funded by local business group Investors in Lincoln. Although ideas to improve the drain have been floated before Investors in Lincoln wanted to draw them all together into one masterplan. The masterplan framework can then be used as an evidence base from which bids to fund and develop the identified schemes will be launched. Sustrans' Senior Urban Designer, Midlands & East, Matt Jenks, is leading on the project and is pleased with the support it’s received from residents so far. He said; “Local people have brought great ideas to the table, along with their enthusiasm and can do attitude. The ideas and projects that are developing from them will provide the ingredients needed for the drain to realise its potential. It’s inspiring to hear about the great work already happening, including RiverCare which is an example of how local people can come together and make a massive difference to their neighbourhood”. […]

  • 'Glow in the dark’ path lights the way for active travel in Bridgend
    by Sustrans on 18th July 2018 at 8:11 PM

    12 July 2018, , A pioneering new ‘glow in the dark’ path installed in Bridgend forms part of a network connecting homes, schools and local businesses. The 300 metre path, which runs through the Woodlands playing fields to link up Brook Vale with Llwyn Gwern, has a photo-luminescent resin surface that harnesses UV light during the day so that it can emit a gentle light to help make the route visible in the dark. From Llwyn Gwern, the traffic-free route continues through to Pencoed Comprehensive School and Croesty Primary School, forming part of a wider scheme to improve active travel access in Pencoed which has been funded from the Welsh Government’s Safe Routes in Communities programme. The initial idea for a path through the fields came from a young pupil at Croesty Primary School. Head teacher Martin Kaye said: “Our pupils always enjoy the opportunity to travel on two wheels so are keen participants in the Active Journeys programme which is delivered in our school by Sustrans and Bridgend County Borough Council.” The scheme has been developed by Bridgend County Borough Council in partnership with Sustrans, the schools and the local community access group, with support from Redrow and Halo Leisure. Hailing the new path as a shining example of how to encourage residents to choose more active forms of travel over cars. Councillor Richard Young, the council’s Cabinet Member for Communities said: “This is the first time we’ve installed such a surface in the county borough as an alternative to more traditional lighting so that the path can be used at night. It’s a really exciting innovation and we are sure that this route will be popular with pupils and parents, providing a realistic option for cars to be left at home for the daily school run.” Councillor Young added: “We are grateful to the Welsh Government for their continuing financial support for this project through the Safe Routes in Communities programme which, following successful funding applications made by the council, has seen an investment totalling more than £1.5m in Pencoed over the past three years.” Roger Dutton, from Sustrans, said: “Working with children and staff at Croesty Primary on the Active Journeys Programme, it’s clear that there’s a real enthusiasm throughout the school community to travel actively. We worked with the pupils to identify barriers and think of solutions that would allow more families to scoot and cycle, ensuring that the pupils were central to the process, which proved to be a rewarding learning experience for everyone. “Active travel has many benefits for the whole school community, and so it’s important that young people have the opportunity to access safe and convenient routes wherever practical. This new path is an innovative way to encourage families to walk, scoot and cycle the school run, and to keep doing so during the darker winter months too. “Bridgend County Borough Council should be commended for trying something new and we hope to see more innovation like this in the coming years.”  Find out more about our work to transform the school run in Wales […]

  • “Why we cycle” film premiers in London on 18 July
    by Sustrans on 18th July 2018 at 8:11 PM

    11 July 2018, A Dutch documentary "Why We Cycle" will premiere in London on 18 July, a year after it was first screened at Velo-city 2017, a global conference on cycling and urban mobility. The film features filmmakers taking a bike ride with specialists from a variety of disciplines as well as ordinary people. Their conversations uncover some obvious, and also some hidden, effects of cycling on people, on societies, and on the organisation of cities - whilst suggesting the key to the bicycle's success in the Netherlands.  The documentary was produced by Dutch filmmakers Gertjan Hulster and Arne Gielen, journalist Jeroen Dirks and Marco te Brömmelstroet of the Urban Cycling Institute at the University of Amsterdam, with voiceovers by Chris Boardman. “Why We Cycle” is hosted by Sustrans London on Wednesday 18 July at 6:30 (the screening will start at 7pm), at The Gallery, 70 Cowcross Street, London EC1M6EJ. This event is not for profit, and all ticket sales will go towards covering screening costs. Admission includes a drink and popcorn. Cycle parking available. Find out more and purchase tickets available via our Eventbrit […]