London Cycling Campaign News

  • 2017 David Eales Memorial Ride
    on October 4, 2017 at 3:39 pm

    For those of you who may not have known David Eales, he was a prominent member of Ealing Cycling Campaign, and sadly passed away in August of last year. A popular and well-loved local figure, David was a passionate advocate for cycling in Ealing and beyond.  For the first time in 2016, a group of cyclists came together to organise the David Eales Memorial Ride – a 4-6 day group charity ride from London to Amsterdam. The ride is long but leisurely, averaging 60 miles (about 100km) each day.  Since the success of their first ride in September 2016, the group has really taken shape, building a website to promote and organise the event, hosting meetings to prepare cyclists for the week long trip and have even published a printed manual, distilling the experience from the first ride into an outline for future teams looking to take on the challenge.  The riders of this year’s Eales Ride raised an astounding £3,581.52 for LCC and SJS Awareness UK in memory of David, and we'd like to thank everyone who participated in the journey to Amsterdam to celebrate David’s life, carrying on the legacy of his contributions and dedication to cycling in London.  To find out more information on The David Eales Memorial Ride, please visit their website or JustGiving page. You can also find them on Twitter @eales_ride or #ealesride. &nbs […]

  • Ben Chico: LCC's Youngest Campaigner
    on October 2, 2017 at 9:56 am

        If you click onto Ben Chico’s JustGiving page, you’ll see this simple opening line: I am 9 and raising money for more cycling lanes for London Cycling Campaign because we can’t afford more pollution and cycling helps! We couldn’t have said it better ourselves, Ben. Ben is our youngest campaigner and fundraiser to date. A dedicated commuter, he sees the value in streets being child-friendly again, so that kids get the chance to experience – and learn from the fun and freedom that a bike brings, and his fundraising page aims to do exactly that. We were able to chat with Ben and ask him a few questions about his involvement with LCC and what he hopes for in his fundraising endeavours: LCC: Why are you raising money for the London Cycling Campaign? Ben Chico: Because we can't afford more pollution and cycling helps! LCC: What’s your favourite thing about cycling to school? BC: It’s good exercise and I like to go fast! LCC: What’s your least favourite thing about cycling to school? BC: I absolutely hate witnessing cycling accidents. LCC: How did you win the competition to go to the Eden Project – what did you learn from your visit? BC: I learnt how much damage we are doing the environment and how we can to make it better! I won the competition by entering a manifesto, as did other students who wanted to go to the Eden Project, and the head teacher chose 24 of the best, which fortunately included mine! LCC: What’s more difficult – running 5km or getting people to sponsor you? BC: Even though neither were too hard, getting the sponsors was easier than the 5km race. LCC: How much do you hope to raise? BC: I would like to get to £800 or more.  Ben has currently raised £415.12, just over half of his £800 target. Please help Ben reach his goals to help build a cycling London by donating today.   LCC would like to thank Ben (who turned 10 this month!) for his tireless campaigning work on behalf of LCC and for reminding us all that it’s never too early to start building a happy and healthy cycling London. &nbs […]

  • Second Cycle Superhighway announced – Tower Bridge to Greenwich
    on September 28, 2017 at 10:30 am

    Following hot on the heels of the announcement of CS9 in west London last week, the Mayor of London has today opened the public consultation on CS4 from Tower Bridge to Greenwich. London Cycling Campaign will be producing a campaign action so everyone will easily and quickly be able to respond to TfL’s consultation in the next week or two. Meanwhile, everyone can feed their views in to help form our response at our Cyclescape thread here. As with CS9, our Infrastructure Advisory Panel and borough reps are positive about the scheme as an initial response, but we’ll need to dive into the detail before publishing a fuller response. However, on first look, this is a big win for south east London – fixing major junctions and enabling lots more people to cycle. We’d like to see the scheme extended to London Bridge and into central London to link to other schemes, and to Woolwich. We’re also very concerned about the missing section around Lower Road. The detail Cycle Superhighway CS4 runs from Tower Bridge to Greenwich. It features largely “bidirectional” two-way cycle tracks stretching for over 4km. The route means cyclists can finally avoid the infamous Rotherhithe roundabout. And already around 3,500 people cycle it daily, putting it in the top 5 percent of roads for cycling in London already, with TfL having also analysed high potential for more trips too, and despite there having been 93 collisions involving cyclists in the last three years alone along this section of the A200. The route is expected to be extended from London Bridge and to Woolwich in a second phase, and the Lower Road section is missing in this consultation, but promised in 2018. Quoted in the Mayor of London’s press release, Simon Munk, Infrastructure Campaigner, London Cycling Campaign, said: “This route will dramatically improve dangerous junctions in south-east London, including the Rotherhithe roundabout. It will make them far safer for the thousands who already cycle through them daily. And CS4, like CS9 announced last week, won’t just calm collision hotspots for those who already cycle – it will unlock the potential for far more people to cycle, for far more journeys. CS4 and CS9 take a big step towards fulfilling the Mayor’s commitment to our members to triple the protected space for cycling on main roads, which is key to lots more everyday journeys happening by bike.” The full press release from the Mayor and TfL is below: Mayor unveils plans for new fully-segregated cycle superhighway for south-east London ·         Cycle Superhighway 4 will link Tower Bridge to Greenwich with more than 4km of segregated track ·         New cycle superhighway will bring first high-quality segregated route to south-east London and link to the wider network ·         Work also includes five new traffic light pedestrian crossings and the upgrade of more than 20 existing crossings The Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, has today announced plans to introduce the first high-quality segregated cycle route to south-east London. Cycle Superhighway 4 will bring safer cycling to the area as it connects Tower Bridge to Greenwich using more than four kilometres of segregated tracks. The route has been identified as a priority due to the area’s high demand for cycling – with nearly 3,500 daily trips already made on the A200 – high potential for more people to take up cycling, and the need for safety improvements, with 93 collisions involving cyclists along this section of the A200 in three years. The announcement comes a week after the Mayor unveiled a consultation on Cycle Superhighway 9, which will add nearly 6km of new segregated track to the capital’s roads between Kensington Olympia to Brentford. Together the two superhighways will play a vital role in the Mayor’s work to promote cycling and walking for the good of Londoners’ health and air quality. The Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, said: “I’m delighted to be able to announce plans to bring more than 4km of segregated cycle lanes to south-east London. We need more Londoners to cycle and walk for the good of their health and our air quality, and that’s why we’re working so hard make cycling safer and easier right across the capital. By bringing this route to an area of such high demand, this superhighway really will open up cycling to thousands more Londoners.” Will Norman, London’s Walking and Cycling Commissioner, said: “I’m so pleased that we can share our plans for Cycle Superhighway 4 just one week after announcing Cycle Superhighway 9. These new routes are a key part of our work to make cycling more accessible across London and will add more than 10km of segregated lanes to the capital’s roads. South-east London is an area of huge cycling potential so I know that CS4 will make a real difference to so many cyclists and budding riders by providing a safe segregated route that links straight into our growing cycling network.” Nadia Broccardo, Chief Executive of Team London Bridge, said: “Businesses in the London Bridge area are keen to make this a safe and attractive place to walk and cycle, whether it’s for employees cycling to work or visitors coming to enjoy the attractions. With a new station and continued growth in the area, getting a street environment that makes cycling convenient, safe and attractive is more pressing than ever. We welcome the CS4 consultation and look forward to new investment ensuring a world class street environment for a healthy London Bridge.” The first part of the consultation, which launches today, includes more than four kilometres of two-way segregated cycle tracks on Tooley Street, Jamaica Road, Evelyn Street and Creek Road. It features five new traffic light pedestrian crossings, the upgrade of more than 20 existing crossings, and the redesign of the Rotherhithe Roundabout, which was identified as a priority as part of the Mayor’s Safer Junctions programme. It will also connect to the wider cycling network, connecting with Quietway 14 via segregated lane on Tanner Street. This quietway would link the North-South Cycle Superhighway with the proposed Cycle Superhighway 4. Plans for the section on Lower Road, which will incorporate the regeneration planned for Canada Water, will be consulted on next year. Quotes from stakeholders Councillor Alan Smith, Deputy Mayor and Cabinet Member for Growth and Regeneration at Lewisham Council, said: “We’re very excited at the prospect of a new cycle superhighway coming to the borough. We actively promote healthy and sustainable forms of travel in Lewisham and the adding a segregated route will make cycling much safer and more attractive to new cyclists.” Simon Munk, Infrastructure Campaigner, London Cycling Campaign (LCC), said: “This route will dramatically improve dangerous junctions in south-east London, including the Rotherhithe roundabout. It will make them far safer for the thousands who already cycle through them daily. And CS4, like CS9 announced last week, won’t just calm collision hotspots for those who already cycle – it will unlock the potential for far more people to cycle, for far more journeys. CS4 and CS9 take a big step towards fulfilling the Mayor’s commitment to our members to triple the protected space for cycling on main roads, which is key to lots more everyday journeys happening by bike.” Matt Winfield, Sustrans’ Acting London Director, said: “Cycle Superhighway 4 will be an important way to unlock cycling for more Londoners, helping to clean our air, keep people moving and improve our health. Segregated routes like these are an essential part of the mix to help more of us get on our bikes and will increase the record numbers that already are cycling. And the improvements between Tower Hill and Greenwich, particularly at the Rotherhithe Roundabout, are a real step forward to keep Londoners safer on our streets. Busy main roads and junctions prevent people from cycling or walking. This proposal will make London’s streets healthier and safer.” Leon Daniels, Managing Director of Surface Transport at TfL, said: “Our plans for Cycle Superhighway 4 would dramatically improve access to cycling in south-east London as well as significantly improving pedestrian facilities. The Superhighway is an extremely efficient use of road space, which improves health and brings added environmental benefits, while boosting the local economy. We believe these plans will deliver huge benefits to those who live and work in the area and we know that their views are vital to help us shape our plans, so we can make them work for as many people as possible.” Subject to the results of this consultation, Transport for London (TfL) and partner boroughs aim to start building the cycle superhighway late next year. Notes: The Cycle Superhighway 4 consultation ends on 19 November. It can be found here: www.tfl.gov.uk/cs4 TfL will analyse and consider all the responses received to the consultation, and publish its response next year. Cycling is an extremely efficient use of road space and recently completed cycle lanes in London have shown to be five times more efficient at moving people than a standard traffic lane. A daily average of more than 500,000kms were cycled in the congestion charging zone in 2016. This is up 7.2% since 2014. In 2015 there were 670,000 cycle journeys per day across London, equivalent to 10% of all bus journeys, or one fifth of all tube journeys Safety concerns have long been identified as the number one barrier to cycling, and high-quality cycling infrastructure helps overcome this. The East-West and North-South Cycle Superhighways have seen a significant increase in cycling as a mode of transport along those routes, with nearly three-quarters of users believing they cycle more because of them. The proposed route for Cycle Superhighway 4 is in the top five per cent of London for cycle demand and as well as having a high potential for people to switch from motor vehicle to bicycle. Over three years to August 2016 there were 93 cyclist collisions along this section of the A200.  Rotherhithe Roundabout was identified as having one of the poorest safety records in London by TfL’s Safer Junctions programme.&nbs […]

  • Cyclist killed in collision with tipper lorry at Chelsea Bridge
    on September 27, 2017 at 2:25 pm

    A female cyclist has been killed in a collision with a 32 tonne tipper lorry at Chelsea Bridge/Grosvenor Road. The collision took place at approximately 7.50am on Wednesday 27th  October 2017.  The cyclist was taken from the scene with what the police described as critical injuries and later died at King’s College Hospital in Denmark Hill.  London Cycling Campaign extends our sympathies to the bereaved. The police have put out a callfor witnesses to the incident. This is, regrettably, the seventh fatality of a cyclist on London roads this year. It is the third involving a lorry.  About half of all cyclist deaths in London involve lorries, with construction lorries being the main vehicle type involved. LCC is calling for protected space for cycling at junctions and on main roads and for safer lorry designs to be adopted across the industry along with the good practice operating standards for heavy vehicles such as CLOCS (Construction Logistics and Community Safety) standard. TfL is currently in the process of consulting on improved vehicle safety standards for HGVs driven on London roads.&nbs […]

  • Full response to Mayor's Transport Strategy
    on September 27, 2017 at 10:33 am

    If you've got two minutes, please take our easy action to respond to the Mayor's Transport Strategy. However, if you want to write a fuller and more informed response to the strategy, we've now published our full response here (also on our regularly updated consultation responses page here. The key points and themes included in our main response are: The MTS is a bold document and its principles are worthy of support LCC supports the long term switch away from over-dependence on motor vehicles in favour of walking, cycling, public transport and access to vehicle-sharing schemes. We agree that this will keep London moving, reduce air pollution and carbon emissions, improve public health and improve the quality of public spaces. Borough buy-in, and indeed mechanisms to ensure boroughs play their full part, is vital to delivery of the MTS Dynamic road-pricing will also be vital, soon, to ensure London can continue to shift from motorised to active modes of travel. In the meantime we support pollution charging to incentivise the use of cleaner vehicles and active modes/public transport, and call for its extension London-wide Interim targets are needed to ensure subsequent Mayors remain on track to fulfil the long-term ambitions laid out in the strategy Included in those interim targets should be the Mayor's pledges as part of our "Sign for Cycling" campaign - notably to triple the mileage of protected space for cycling on main roads by the end of his (first) term There should also be specific, ambitious mode targets for cycling Other major recommendations are: There must be a quality bar for funding for cycling schemes  More clarity should be applied on what cycling infrastructure works - main road tracks, modal filter cells etc. The Mayor should support national campaigns to improve junction designs Bus lanes are not appropriate cycle infrastructure - but where there are no cycle tracks alongside, motorbikes and taxis in bus lanes further reduce what benefit the lanes bestow for those cycling - and should not be allowed in. Bus priority provision should not come at the expense of cycling provision. Cycle parking (including at transport interchanges), cycle theft prevention and police resources for dealing with crime to those cycling must be improved Measures to increase cycling to school must be included to encorage active travel by children The strategy should encompass freight consolidation, but also specific measures to support electric cycles, cargo cycles and other measures to broaden the use of an appeal of cycling as a transport mode for individuals and goods Safety training and systems as well as safer lorry standards should rapidly be spread through the transport industry All major projects should align with the strategy - those such as the Silvertown Tunnel that do not, should not move forward TfL should establish a cycling best practice centre to ensure boroughs and TfL and others move forward with the best schemes and the best community engagement […]

  • New west London Cycle Superhighway announced
    on September 21, 2017 at 11:34 am

    Today, the Mayor of London has taken a major and long-awaited step forward by opening public consultation on CS9 in west London between Olympia and Brentford. London Cycling Campaign will be producing a campaign action so everyone will easily and quickly be able to respond to TfL’s consultation in the next week or two. Meanwhile, everyone can feed their views in to help form our response at our Cyclescape thread here. We can’t confirm what our formal response will be yet – but initial views from borough groups and our Infrastructure Advisory Panel have been broadly very positive – this should be a major scheme unlocking cycling for a lot more people across a swathe of London underserved by cycling infrastructure so far. Of course, there will be criticisms we’ll raise – most notably – why does it stop at the Kensington & Chelsea border rather than link to nearby other schemes such as the E-W Cycle Superhighway? And when will the second section out to Hounslow be advanced? The detail Cycle Superhighway CS9 runs from the Kensington & Chelsea border at Olympia to Brentford. It features a mix of “bidirectional” two-way cycle tracks, “with flow” one way cycle tracks (on both sides of the road) and quieter streets with modal filters. The route passes through several major junctions – including the northern side of the Hammersmith gyratory and Kew Road – with cycle-specific lights. The route is expected to be extended out to Hounslow in a second phase, which would potentially link directly into a further scheme to Heathrow which has been highlighted by TfL and the Mayor as one of the 25 highest priority routes for cycling not yet planned in London (it is 21 in the Strategic Cycling Analysis). Quoted in the Mayor of London’s press release, Simon Munk, Infrastructure Campaigner, London Cycling Campaign, said: “LCC welcomes the Mayor’s plans for a new Cycle Superhighway in West London. This route will tame several dangerous junctions, enable far more people of all ages and abilities to cycle to local shops, stations and into work and extend the Cycle Superhighway network to areas where cycling demand is high but cycling infrastructure is virtually non-existent. It will help achieve the vision of a greener, healthier and less congested city set out in the Mayor’s Transport Strategy and is a big step by the Mayor towards fulfilling the commitment made to LCC members and supporters to triple the extent of protected space for cycling on main roads.” The full press release from the Mayor and TfL is below: Mayor launches consultation for new segregated cycle superhighway •          Cycle Superhighway 9 will link Kensington Olympia to Brentford with nearly 6km of segregated track •          New cycle superhighway will bring first high-quality segregated lane to west London •          Route will improve cycling and pedestrian facilities The Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, has today announced a consultation for a new segregated cycle superhighway that will bring safer cycling to west London. Cycle Superhighway 9 will add nearly 6km of new segregated track to the capital’s roads linking Kensington Olympia to Brentford. It will also feature significant improvements for pedestrians with new traffic light crossings and improvements to pedestrian crossings. The superhighway forms a key part of the Mayor’s work to encourage more Londoners to walk and cycle as he makes the capital’s streets healthier, safer and more welcoming. The Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, said: “As the capital continues to grow, it is vital that we encourage more Londoners to walk and cycle to improve health, productivity and air quality. That’s why I’ve set out bold plans to change the way we look at how our transport network and committed record levels of investment to improve cycling. This new cycle superhighway will bring a high-quality segregated cycle lane to west London for the very first time. It will make a real difference in encouraging Londoners of all ages and abilities to get on their bikes and improve conditions for pedestrians across the area.” Will Norman, London’s Walking and Cycling Commissioner, said: “I’m delighted that we can today announce nearly 6km of new segregated cycle lanes for London. Cycle Superhighway 9 will be hugely important in helping cyclists in the west travel safely and inspire many more Londoners to take up cycling for the first time. It also includes significant improvements for pedestrians that will make walking around the local area more appealing and encourage even more people to add both walking and cycling to their daily routines.” Cycle Superhighway 9 will see roads transformed from Kensington Olympia to Brentford, making it safer to cycle and easier to cross roads in west London, while reducing through traffic on some residential roads. The proposal includes nearly 6km of segregated cycle tracks on major west London roads, including Hammersmith Road, King Street, Chiswick High Road, Brentford High Street and Kew Bridge Road, and the ability for cyclists to bypass Hammersmith Gyratory and Kew Bridge Junction. Through traffic will be removed from residential roads Wellesley Road and Stile Hall Gardens, and there will be five new traffic light crossings and more than 20 upgraded pedestrian crossings. (Quotes from stakeholders) Simon Munk, Infrastructure Campaigner, London Cycling Campaign (LCC), said: “LCC welcomes the Mayor’s plans for a new Cycle Superhighway in West London. This route will tame several dangerous junctions, enable far more people of all ages and abilities to cycle to local shops, stations and into work and extend the Cycle Superhighway network to areas where cycling demand is high but cycling infrastructure is virtually non-existent. It will help achieve the vision of a greener, healthier and less congested city set out in the Mayor’s Transport Strategy and is a big step by the Mayor towards fulfilling the commitment made to LCC members and supporters to triple the extent of protected space for cycling on main roads.” Cllr Wesley Harcourt, Hammersmith & Fulham (H&F) Cabinet Member for Environment, Transport and Residents’ Services, said: “For many people in H&F, intimidation from the sheer volume of other road users prevents them from cycling, so in our Cycle Strategy we’ve set out to change that. As part of our aim of becoming the greenest borough in the country, we want to double the number of journeys in the borough being taken by bike. Key to that aim is making people feel safe. This new route enables people to get right across the borough and into central London easily, and without the fear of sharing space with large motor vehicles.” Cllr Amrit Mann, Deputy Leader of Hounslow Council and Cabinet Member for Environment, said: “In line with the aspirations of our transport strategy, The London Borough of Hounslow is committed to delivering schemes aimed at encouraging more people to take up cycling and invite all residents and businesses to take the opportunity to shape these proposals.” Leon Daniels, Managing Director of Surface Transport at TfL, said: “Giving more people access to safer cycling and easier walking gives huge benefits to London. This is why I’m so pleased we’re able to announce our latest proposal for west London. We want people who live and work in this area to let us know what they think to our plans so we can make them work for as many people as possible.” Subject to the results of this consultation, Transport for London (TfL) and partner boroughs aim to start building the cycle superhighway late next year. The intention is to extend Cycle Superhighway 9 into Hounslow and to hold a consultation on this next year. Notes: The Cycle Superhighway 9 consultation can be found at www.tfl.gov.uk/cs9 The consultation closes on 31 October. TfL will analyse and consider all the responses received, and publish its response next year. Cycling is an extremely efficient use of road space and recently completed cycle lanes in London have shown to be five times more efficient at moving people than a standard traffic lane. A daily average of more than 500,000kms were cycled in the congestion charging zone in 2016. This is up 7.2% since 2014. In 2015 there were 670,000 cycle journeys per day across London, equivalent to 10% of all bus journeys, or one fifth of all tube journeys  Safety concerns have long been identified as the number one barrier to cycling, and high-quality cycling infrastructure helps overcome this. The East-West and North-South Cycle Superhighways have seen a significant increase in cycling as a mode of transport along those routes, with nearly three-quarters of users believing they cycle more because of them. […]

  • The 2018 RideLondon Ballot Open Now!
    on September 13, 2017 at 4:17 pm

    Entries are filling up fast for Europe's biggest sportive, the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100, which returns on  which returns on Sunday 29 July 2018. For a chance to win a place in what has become one of the world's greatest bike rides, enter the ballot today. Almost 30,000 cyclists completed this year's epic 100-mile challenge. Starting from Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in Stratford, you'll head out through London towards Surrey's stunning countryside before returning to the capital to finish in spectacular style on The Mall in front of Buckingham Palace, greeted by thousands of cheering cycling fans. Filled with challenging climbs, stunning scenery and a great atmosphere, it’s truly an amazing event.  Ride for Team LCC in 2018! Team LCC is made up of women and men, racers and commuters, 'serious' cyclists and beginners, old hands and new recruits. What they all have in common is a passionate interest in the work of London Cycling Campaign and a desire to make cycling in London safer and more accessible for everyone. If you’re lucky enough to get a ballot place we’d love you to ride for Team LCC and raise money to support the London Cycling Campaign. We’ll send you a Team LCC jersey and every penny you raise will help support vital projects and campaigns like the Lorry Safety Project and Sign for Cycling. Team LCC will also run a summer training programme in the Surrey Hills to make sure you're ready on the day. So while the ballot for next year's event is now open, entries are filling fast! To be in with a chance of taking part in 2018 enter the ballot now. Contact TeamLCC@lcc.org.uk for more information. […]

  • Take Action: give feedback on the Mayor's Transport Strategy
    on September 13, 2017 at 4:05 pm

      The Mayor of London wants to know what you think about his new Mayor's Transport Strategy (MTS) – the document that will dictate policy on how people travel around the city for decades to come. At the London Cycling Campaign, we know that making it safer, easier and more enjoyable for people to walk, cycle and take public transport is the solution to many of the big challenges facing our city, such as air pollution, the growing inactivity crisis, and creating a thriving and happy capital. So after taking a look at this draft strategy, we agree with the long-term vision. The Mayor wants to increase the number of trips made by walking, cycling and on public transport from 64% to 80% by 2041 – an important goal given the rapidly growing population of London. However, this target isn’t specific about how many of those new sustainable trips will be made by bikes. And with most of the headline goals aiming for 2041, six mayoral elections away, there are no halfway markers or route maps for getting there. If the vision set out in this MTS isn’t at the heart of everything that is produced in the remaining 2 years of his first term, what happens after that? To make genuine progress towards these goals, the Mayor needs to start now – and that means showing us how he will meet his Sign for Cycling promises; he's made a good start on making lorries safer and creating Liveable Neighbourhoods, but we're well behind on the pace needed to triple the length of protected cycle provision by the end of his first term. Please take a few minutes to respond using the TfL consultation on the Mayor's Transport Strategy. The key points we’ll be highlighting are: We strongly support the vision of the MTS, and share the view that a shift away from the car will help improve air quality, encourage active travel and reduce road danger. We strongly support the proposals to prioritise walking and cycling and reduce motor traffic dominance. We strongly support the aim of eliminating all serious injuries and deaths on our roads. While we support the vision and ambition of the MTS, we need to see early action to set the trajectory of the strategy on track to achieve these long term targets. That includes a plan from Sadiq about what he will do during his remaining term of office to meet the Sign for Cycling pledge, specifically on tripling the length of protected cycle provision, to set his MTS off in the right direction.   We want a clear target for the number of sustainable trips that will be made by bike by 2041 (including intrim targets to help achieve that goal).  We also want it to be clear what ‘high quality cycle routes’ mean in practice. We think it's vital that the Mayor has tools to ensure the boroughs deliver on his Transport Strategy, as 95% of London's roads are in their control. Have your say on London’s future. Our full response to the Mayor's Transport Strategy, if you want the detail, is available as a PDF here or via our public consultation page. […]

  • London Cycling Campaign & Dennis Eagle Launch New Lorry Safety Project
    on September 12, 2017 at 11:24 am

    At an Exchanging Places event hosted by the City of London today, the London Cycling Campaign (LCC) and HGV manufacturer Dennis Eagle launched a major new initiative to reduce the number of cyclists and pedestrians killed or seriously injured in collisions with lorries. Such collisions account for around half of all the cyclist deaths each year in the capital, with construction industry lorries the main vehicle type involved. The new Lorry Safety Project, run by LCC with by sponsorship from Dennis Eagle, provides advice and support to lorry operators on reducing risks to people walking and cycling as well as advising people how to stay safe when cycling near lorries. The event was timed to occur the day before Cycle to Work Day, when thousands of Londoners are expected to try commuting by bike. LCC’s road danger reduction expert, Tom Bogdanowicz said: “Many more people will experience the pleasure and convenience of cycling to work tomorrow. Our new Lorry Safety Project provides simple and clear advice on how to stay safe when cycling near lorries during their commute. We are also highlighting how best practice in the industry can be rolled out and made even better to make our roads safer for everyone, such as through the CLOCS lorry safety procedures” Traditional advice to cyclists focuses on the dangers of overtaking a lorry in the narrow gap on the nearside when it may be turning left. But today Mr Bogdanowicz focussed on a risk that is often overlooked: “People often think that a lorry moving to the right poses no risk and then cycle into the space created. They aren’t aware that the vehicle is actually making space to take a sharp left and find themselves heading straight into danger. It's important to be aware of this risk” LCC has long advocated that a type of lorry design that maximises the ability of drivers to see people around them should be adopted as standard, and has won a promise from the Mayor, Sadiq Khan, to make such Direct Vision lorries “the norm” on London’s streets. Dennis Eagle is leading the way with its new Direct Vision construction industry vehicle, which members of the public got a chance to see and experience at the Exchanging Places event. Lee Rowland, sales and marketing manager for Dennis Eagle said: “Thanks to our Elite 6 cab, the Dennis Eagle tipper offers more direct visibility than standard construction tippers. Narrowed ‘A’ and ‘B’ pillars aid peripheral vision to give an unobscured view and prevent traffic disappearing from sight while longer, panoramic windows give enhanced over-the-shoulder visibility at junctions. “The cab is also positioned closer to the road, giving drivers a better sense of the vehicle’s proportions and, importantly, more visibility of cyclists. With roads getting busier, it is essential that vehicles are designed to ensure maximum safety and the work of the Lorry Safety Project in equipping cyclists with the knowledge and skills to stay safe during their commute will play an important part in further minimising the risk of accidents on urban roads.” Read our top tips and advice for cycling safely around lorries here: http://lorrysafety.lcc.org.uk/&nbs […]

  • Will Norman speaks out on 9 Elms
    on August 15, 2017 at 2:49 pm

    We will ensure that the final designs for Nine Elms Lane and Battersea Park Road offer a safe, high quality cycle route that can be used by all Londoners to travel between Battersea and Vauxhall." Following on from our blog attacking the recent set of poor quality proposals from TfL, like Nine Elms, that will do little to enable more people to cycle in London, we’ve been contacted by Dr Will Norman, the Walking & Cycling Commissioner, to clarify City Hall’s position these schemes. We reproduce his response to LCC’s action on Nine Elms in full below. We are very heartened to hear Dr Norman and the Mayor are listening to our concerns, although it has yet to be explained why such poor proposals were allowed to get to public consultation in the first place. Dr Norman encourages LCC members and supporters to make their views known, and it remains vital that we continue to voice strong opposition to the current plans for Nine Elms as well as defend genuine steps forward such as at the key Lambeth Bridge junctions. Dr Will Norman, Walking & Cycling Commissioner: “We’re absolutely determined to make cycling safer and easier for all Londoners. That’s why we’ve secured record levels of investment for cycling and launched a Healthy Streets approach that puts walking and cycling at the heart of a huge range of our policies. “We are committed to improving cycling right across London and I want to assure you that we will only take forward projects that will bring real benefits. We will ensure that the final designs for Nine Elms Lane and Battersea Park Road offer a safe, high quality cycle route that can be used by all Londoners to travel between Battersea and Vauxhall. The proposals we published are not finalised designs, they are ideas for consultation and I strongly encourage you to have your say. We want to hear views from as wide a range of people as possible as the plans are developed. We need both your support and your criticism, and I can assure you that your voice will be listened to and reflected in the changes that will be made to the design for this route following the consultation.   “I also want to invite you to have your say on our other cycling proposals. We are consulting on a long-overdue transformation of Waterloo IMAX, closing off one arm of the roundabout to create a tree-filled public square and segregated cycle lanes. And a little further up the river, we have developed proposals to make walking and cycling safer at the northern and southern roundabouts of Lambeth Bridge. On the bridge itself, our plans include two-metre wide cycle tracks in both directions. “I can also tell you that we’re looking forward to sharing our plans for the next two major cycling routes – Cycle Superhighways 4 and 9 – in the autumn. As you’ve seen from our Strategic Cycling Analysis, we’ve got big plans for the future of cycling in London. Our Cycling Delivery Plan, to be published later this year, will set out more details on which of these routes we will be prioritising for investment and I encourage you to keep making your voices heard so that that we can take these projects forward.” Please spend two minutes using our super-easy consultation responses to: Send a message to TfL and City Hall we won’t tolerate schemes as poor as 9 Elms. Support Lambeth Bridge to remove two terrible roundabouts, a big improvement on the current situation, while suggesting how the weakest links could be better. It's clear our response to these schemes is being heard loud and clear at City Hall. Let's keep the pressure on. […]